SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS

Alcohol intake and risk of nonmelanoma skin cancer: a systematic review and dose–response meta‐analysis

Commentary or Editorial available

Article first published online: 26 Jul 2017
DOI: 10.1111/bjd.15647

Comment on this article

Summary

Nonmelanoma skin cancer ( NMSC ) comprises mainly basal cell carcinoma ( BCC ) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma ( cSCC ). The association between alcohol intake and NMSC has been inconclusive; therefore the objective of this study is to quantify the relationship between alcohol intake and NMSC using meta‐analyses. A systematic literature search of PubMed and Embase was performed on 30 October 2016. Eligible articles were case–control or cohort studies that examined alcohol intake and risk of BCC or cSCC and reported relative risks ( RR s) with 95% confidence intervals ( CI s). Of the 307 articles identified, 13 case–control and cohort studies were included in the systematic review, including 95 241 NMSC cases (91 942 BCC and 3299 cSCC cases). A random‐effects model was used to obtain summary RR s and 95% CI s for dose–response meta‐analyses. For every 10‐gram increase in ethanol intake per day, a positive association was found for both BCC (summary RR of 1·07; 95% CI 1·04–1·09) and cSCC (summary RR of 1·11; 95% CI 1·06–1·16). While there was evidence suggesting a nonlinear association for BCC , it may be due to the sparse data at higher alcohol intake levels. This meta‐analysis found evidence that alcohol drinking is positively associated with both BCC and cSCC risk in a dose‐dependent manner. These results should be interpreted with caution due to potential residual confounding. Nonetheless, because alcohol drinking is a prevalent and modifiable behaviour, it could serve as an important public health target to reduce the global health burden of NMSC.

Read moreRead more (PDF)

Share this article

0

Favourite

Comments

If you want to submit a letter for publication rather than comment on an article please submit through Scholar One: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bjd

There are no comments for this article yet.

Recent Tweets

@BrJDermatol

05 Dec 2019

RT The British Association of Dermatologists @HealthySkin4All: The authors of this @BrJDermatol study have described factors which could help doctors to identify children with eczema at a higher risk of eczema continuing into adulthood. https://t.co/ZNNzE7iZ4h @eczemasociety @eczemasupport @EczemaOutreach @Wiley_Health https://t.co/2ADGsWtDAY

@BrJDermatol

04 Dec 2019

The December issue of @BrJDermatol is out now! https://t.co/5k5nitO7lx https://t.co/XeGa1M69uC

@BrJDermatol

04 Dec 2019

RT The British Association of Dermatologists @HealthySkin4All: You can stay up to date with all the latest research from the @BrJDermatol by reading the free plain language summaries of research online here: https://t.co/SY2AkPpw61 https://t.co/gaNkextAJj

@BrJDermatol

04 Dec 2019

In #psoriasis how does the #microbiome differ in #lesional skin compared to normal skin and controls? Results from standard culture and 16S RNA sequencing: https://t.co/5IvWYjltcn https://t.co/abvf9cbvUl

@BrJDermatol

03 Dec 2019

Watch this video about developing and validating the PP-NRS (Peak Pruritus Numerical Rating Scale), a psychometric test for assessing the intensity of #itch in patients with #AtopicDermatitis : https://t.co/c0UXDaxeC6

@BrJDermatol

03 Dec 2019

RT EPI-PHARE @EPIPHARE: Des membres d'EPI-PHARE ont publié un article dans British Journal of Dermatology [EN] New article from EPI-PHARE members in @BrJDermatol ➡️ Persistence of treatment with conventional systemic agents for patients with #psoriasis... 🔗 https://t.co/WKcPUhs4Io https://t.co/0GDaE7byHy

Close